Difference between revisions of "Milling Machine"

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(Created page with "{{Template:EquipmentPage |owner=ENTS |model=Craftex CX600 |serial=SERIAL NUMBER |arrived=Not Arrived Yet (paid, on back-order) |doesitwork=Works |contact=[[User:Orcinus|Raphae...")
 
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== Equipment Settings ==
 
== Equipment Settings ==
 
Don't you dare change the angle of the tilt head. I will kill you, because tramming a milling machine is a very tedious process that can potentially take hours to accomplish. If you need to mill at an angle, clamp your part at an angle or buy the correct endmill. Do not change the tilt of the head!
 
Don't you dare change the angle of the tilt head. I will kill you, because tramming a milling machine is a very tedious process that can potentially take hours to accomplish. If you need to mill at an angle, clamp your part at an angle or buy the correct endmill. Do not change the tilt of the head!
 +
 +
== Safety ==
 +
1. Cutters and fingers do not like each other. Handle all cutters with respect. They are extremely sharp. Never let your fingers get close to a rotating cutter. Treat them like razor blades. <br>
 +
2. Verify the rotational direction of the spindle is correct before you start cutting. This will almost always be clockwise or "forward". <br>
 +
3. Verify the tool is securely fastened in the spindle before turning on the machine. <br>
 +
4. Climb milling is only recommended for experienced machinists. Use conventional milling instead wherever possible. Climb milling can suck a part into the cutter especially on machines with excessive backlash in the leadscrews. [[Media:Climb_vs_conventional.jpg]]<br>
 +
5. Ensure the part is securely affixed in the vise or to the table, and that the vise is also securely affixed to the table. CORRECT use of the clamping kit is critical for parts not held in a vise.<br>
 +
6. Start the cutter's rotation while it is well clear of the part, especially with a fly cutter or multi-insert facemill. <br>
 +
7. Ensure the spindle speed is appropriate for the tool type, diameter, and material to be cut. <br>
 +
8. Use medium-low speeds for the edgefinder. Do not raise an edgefinder off a part's edge while the spindle is turning. It may snag and destroy the edgefinder, part, or worse. <br>
 +
9. Never leave the drawbar wrench on the drawbar. Never never never. This is as critical and dangerous as leaving a key in a lathe chuck. <br>
 +
 
== Modifications ==
 
== Modifications ==
 
== Working on it ==
 
== Working on it ==
 
== Known Problems ==
 
== Known Problems ==
 
== Future Ideas ==
 
== Future Ideas ==

Revision as of 14:38, 4 June 2014

Back to list of Equipment

CX600.jpg

Contents

Label

Milling Machine http://ents.ca/index.php/Milling_Machine

General

  • Owner/Loaner: ENTS
  • Make/Model: Craftex CX600
  • Usability: Works
  • Contact: Raphael B.
  • Where: Metalworking Bay (Garage)
  • Certification Needed: Yes
  • Hackable: No
  • Estimated Value: $1500

Instructions

{{{Instructions}}}

Current State

WAITING ON ARRIVAL!

Specifications

Motor: 3/4-HP, 110-V, Single Phase
Drilling Capacity: 1”
End Mill Capacity: 5/8”
Face Mill Capacity: 2-1/2”
Spindle Taper: R8
Spindle Stroke: 2”
Head Tilt:45° left or right)
Number of Spindle Speeds: Variable
Range of Spindle Speeds: 50 – 2250 RPM
Working Surface of Table: 20” x 7”
Table Longitudinal Travel: 11”
Table Cross Travel: 7”
Table Vertical Travel: 15”
Number of T-Slots: 3
T-Slot Size: 3/8”

Equipment Settings

Don't you dare change the angle of the tilt head. I will kill you, because tramming a milling machine is a very tedious process that can potentially take hours to accomplish. If you need to mill at an angle, clamp your part at an angle or buy the correct endmill. Do not change the tilt of the head!

Safety

1. Cutters and fingers do not like each other. Handle all cutters with respect. They are extremely sharp. Never let your fingers get close to a rotating cutter. Treat them like razor blades.
2. Verify the rotational direction of the spindle is correct before you start cutting. This will almost always be clockwise or "forward".
3. Verify the tool is securely fastened in the spindle before turning on the machine.
4. Climb milling is only recommended for experienced machinists. Use conventional milling instead wherever possible. Climb milling can suck a part into the cutter especially on machines with excessive backlash in the leadscrews. Media:Climb_vs_conventional.jpg
5. Ensure the part is securely affixed in the vise or to the table, and that the vise is also securely affixed to the table. CORRECT use of the clamping kit is critical for parts not held in a vise.
6. Start the cutter's rotation while it is well clear of the part, especially with a fly cutter or multi-insert facemill.
7. Ensure the spindle speed is appropriate for the tool type, diameter, and material to be cut.
8. Use medium-low speeds for the edgefinder. Do not raise an edgefinder off a part's edge while the spindle is turning. It may snag and destroy the edgefinder, part, or worse.
9. Never leave the drawbar wrench on the drawbar. Never never never. This is as critical and dangerous as leaving a key in a lathe chuck.

Modifications

Working on it

Known Problems

Future Ideas

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